Helping Others Through Faith and Fantasy

Posts tagged “writing

Slugs, Torture, the Publishing Process, and Other Horribly Slow Things…

While I wait for Daniel and the Sun Sword to hit the presses NEXT SUMMER, I’ve been working on the second book in the Sons and Daughters series, and I recently hit the 100-page mark! For some reason that’s always been a major milestone for me. So…Huzzah!

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On a different note, I’ve had several people ask about the publishing process in general. It’s quite fascinating, really. That is, if you love learning about how millions of people subject themselves to cruelly slow tortures devised by the literary industry.  Here’s a break-down for those who can stomach it:

 

Some people (like yours truly) skipped the literary agent steps and submitted straight to publishers. And I have to say, Ellechor was awesome and quick getting back with me, but that has been the exception, in my experience.  If you’re interested in those big NY publishing houses,  don’t even think about submitting your book unless you have an agent. They’ve exiled writers to the moon for less. I swear.

So there you have it. Throw in a few racks, thumb-screws, and public burnings, and you’ve got the picture.  But despite all that…it’s worth it!

Writers are crazy.

Oh yeah, and just so the title of this post is accurate: I have some stupid slugs in my garden. There.

 

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Guest Blog by Christian-Fantasy Author Scott Appleton

I am excited to host Scott Appleton, veteran Christian-Fantasy author and really cool guy. His input and guidance to me as a writer has proved invaluable. And don’t forget to check out his websites and books below. Enjoy!

Scott Appleton

Fantasy fiction. The very phrase evokes feelings of dread and hope, both of which are powerful motivators in a story. From when I was very young I loved mythology and history. The old English book Pilgrim’s Progress left a lasting impression on me. I was amazed that such blatant allegory had succeeded in not only stirring my imagination but also in convicting my soul.

And that is the power of a good fantasy book. It can provide spiritual lessons that are easier to accept because we understand them in a fictional setting, and it can remind us of the stark contrast between good and evil. The most effective stories remind us that we are created beings accountable to an all-powerful God and we are either for him or against him.

Fantasy stories written from the Christian worldview provide some of the strongest scenarios of all, thanks to these facts: 1) An all-powerful God can exact terrible retribution on those who defy him, and 2) Christian writers value repentance which of course brings about the greatest evolution of characters in stories through transformation.

We are at an exciting time in Christian fiction. We still only have a handful of solidly written and truly original fantasy works available, but slowly that is changing.

My fourth Fantasy novel Neverqueen released December 2013 and it is part of the ever-growing storyworld of The Sword of the Dragon series. You can find my books in stores or online and learn more about me and my writings on my websites.

See you out there in the fantastic worlds that we will explore together!

Scott Appleton is a Christian freelance writer living in southeastern Connecticut. He lives with his wife and three children. His books include Swords of the SixOffspringKey of Living FireNeverqueen, and By Sword By Right.

 


Bursting With a Story?

So far, I’ve had several AWESOME people make several AWESOME submissions to my AWESOME writing contest!

But it’s not too late. If you’re a 6th grader, high-schooler, or college student and you’re about to BURST with a story of your own, submit it for consideration.

Now.

It can be a short story or the first chapter of a book (15 pages or less) from any genre of fiction or non-fiction. A winner from each age group will receive a written critique of their story, and will have the edited version of their work posted on my website.

There is no cost for submission, and the deadline is May 23rd. See my website for more details.

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A Kid and Teenager’s Guide to Getting Published

Whenever I talk to kids and teenagers about writing, there are usually three questions that come up. How long have you been writing? What made you want to be an author? How do you get published? The first two questions are easy to answer; and let’s face it, people only ask them to be polite. (Since I was 14 and because it’s fun. There, I answered them).

People are really interested in the last one. For an author, to be published means a lot of things. Recognition. Encouragement. Relief. Relief most of all. Relief that all the creativity swirling around in your head, and all the effort it took to craft it into something real, wasn’t for nothing. So on to what matters: how kids and teenagers can get published.

There are loads of contests, websites, and magazines that exist solely to publish those in the K-12 category. Below is a list of my favorites. Just be aware that there are TONS more, which you can find by doing a simple Google search.

 

 
1) Stone Soup: This website welcomes submissions by young people up to age 13.
2) Teen Ink: This magazine is written by teens, and it’s a pretty big deal. They’ve been around forever, so check them out no matter what you write. Because they want it.
3) The Claudia Ann Seaman Awards for Young Writers: If you’re in High School, check out this contest for poetry, fiction, and non-fiction.
4) Kids Bookshelf: This site accepts short stories and poems from those 17-years-old and under.
5) Just 4 Kids Magazine: This website accepts submissions from kids and teens to post on their online magazine.
6) Launch Pad Magazine: If you’re ages 6-14, then you can submit your work here.
7) KidsCom: Each week, this site publishes five submissions from kids ages 11 and younger, and 12 and older.
8) KIdsWWwrite: If you’re 16 or younger and like to write stories or poems, check out this website.